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THE BEST NEW ORLEANS STYLE GUMBO

Ingredients

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GUMBO! I made this recipe quite a long time ago. It has been on my mind lately. Maybe the cold, rainy weather here in Charlotte, or maybe even the anticipation of Mardi Gras. I went through pages and pages of my handwritten recipes, and could not locate my original. So, I figured I would have to use my memory on this one. And, “oh my” is all I can say. This is the Best New Orleans Style Gumbo!

Naturally, I created a short TikTok video creating The Best New Orleans Style Gumbo. Be sure to check it out below. If you have not yet signed up for this social media platform, use my code 5SSIS800K0H06 to create an account.

A bowl of The Best New Orleans Style Gumbo in a light grey bowl with rice sitting on a wooden platter

NEW ORLEANS STYLE GUMBO vs JAMBALAYA

Oftentimes, people have difficulty distinguishing the difference between gumbo and jambalaya. Both originated in New Orleans. Gumbo is a soup, or stew that is served with rice. Jambalaya is an actual rice dish, or casserole. Both are similar in that they are made with both meat and rice. However, Gumbo has a much thicker consistency than jambalaya.

Both are similar in that they use a mixture of meat, vegetables and stock. However, that’s where the similarities end. The actual cooking techniques, vary greatly.

A pot of gumbo begins by creating the most perfect roux. Quite the art form, I might add. Afterwards, in goes the holy trinity of onions, green peppers and celery. Whereas, jambalaya starts by cooking the meat.

CREOLE GUMBO vs CAJUN GUMBO

Creole Gumbo generally referred to as Seafood Gumbo, contains shellfish like shrimp and/or crawfish. Cajun Gumbo is typically a combination of both shellfish and chicken. Most often, both styles of gumbo incorporate either ham or sausage. Cooking techniques are generally the same.

WHAT IS A ROUX?

A roux is a combination of flour and fat. Equal parts of each are combined and cooked together to form a thickener. Depending upon the recipe, roux can be white, blonde or brown. The darker the roux, the more intense the flavor.

FAT

Butter is the most common type of fat used to create a roux. However, bacon fat, oil and/or lard can also be used.

HOW TO CREATE ROUX FOR THE BEST NEW ORLEANS STYLE GUMBO

As mentioned above, creating the most perfect roux is quite the art form. You must have a mindset of PATIENCE. You are going to need a ton of it to get the roux just perfect. Consider devoting at least forty-five minutes to an hour, standing over the roux. Yes, one hour of constant stirring! There are no shortcuts when it comes to the roux. SEE PHOTOS BELOW FOR THE ROUX PROGRESSION!

However, once the roux is developed, it’s smooth sailing. I would suggest getting all of the prep work done, prior to starting the roux. You do NOT want it to burn. If it does, you need to start all over again! As daunting as this may sound. It really is not! I will guide you along the way. I took photos every ten minutes so that you could see how the roux develops over time, and compare to what yours should look like.

Once the roux is finished, it’s just a matter of combining most of the remaining ingredients, except for the shrimp, to simmer. For ease, I purchased a rotisserie chicken and shredded. I would do this again and again. Developing an amazing roux will create the best New Orleans Style Gumbo!

HOW TO MAKE THE BEST NEW ORLEANS STYLE GUMBO

THE POT

Given that the roux takes a long time to develop, AND you do not want to risk burning, I highly suggest using a heavy bottom pot. This enameled cast iron pot from Lodge (click here to view), is a perfect cooking vessel. Be sure to slowly, whisk in the flour. Just a little bit at a time.

This is where a fair amount of patience comes into play. You are looking to create a dark roux (like chocolate) without burning! You can do this. I got you. You really need to stand over this pot for the next 45 minutes to an hour. FOR REALS!

STIRRING

Grab your favorite whisk. You and the whisk will be buddies for the next hour. Stir the roux almost continuously. A wooden spoon will work too. Here are a few photos I took of the process. At the very end, I wanted to develop just a touch more darkness, so I did increase the heat just a bit, then removed from stove (I almost went to far).

The following photos show the progression of the roux about every ten minutes. The consistency of the roux may be a liquid or thicker. If you are concerned that it seems too much like liquid, don’t be. As soon as you add the vegetables in the next step, that will all change. Believe me. I liken adding the vegetables as somewhat of a science experiment. Try out this recipe and you will understand!

VEGETABLES FOR NEW ORLEANS STYLE GUMBO

As mentioned earlier, most New Orleans style soups and stews will contain the holy trinity (green peppers, onions and celery). Once the roux is perfect, adding in the green pepper, onions, celery, garlic and okra will naturally cause the roux to thicken even more. This is what yours should look like after you add the vegetables. The roux really thickens up at this stage.

However, be very careful when adding the vegetables. The pot and roux are very hot, so you may experience a little “fizzing.” This is the “science experiment” mentioned above. Again, do not worry. The vegetables are NOT burning. It’s just the oil in the pot and water from the vegetables “fighting” a bit.

vegetables in roux

THICKENING THE GUMBO

I decided against using gumbo file to thicken. This is just my opinion. I’m not really sold on the flavor. However, feel free to do so. Also, the addition of the okra will help to thicken the gumbo.

After simmering, if you feel like the gumbo needs thickened, prepare a cornstarch slurry. Simply, combine a ladle full of the liquid in a bowl with a bit of cornstarch to make a slurry. Turn heat up to medium-high and slowly incorporate the slurry. This will definitely do the trick.

HOW TO SERVE THE BEST NEW ORLEANS STYLE GUMBO

Grab a few bowls and fill with the prepared rice (I kind of cheated here and used VeeTee). It’s my favorite packaged rice. Ladle on this delicious NEW ORLEANS STYLE GUMBO! Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve with a bottle of your favorite hot sauce. ENJOY! You are going to love, love, love this recipe!

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A bowl of The Best New Orleans Style Gumbo in a light grey bowl with rice sitting on a wooden platter

THE BEST NEW ORLEANS STYLE GUMBO


  • Author:Charlotte Fashion Plate
  • Prep Time:15 minutes
  • Cook Time:2 hours 20 minutes
  • Total Time:2 hours 35 minutes
  • Yield:8 servings 1x

Description

Can’t get to New Orleans? Use my recipe and technique to create The Best New Orleans Style Gumbo in your very own home. It’s easier than you may think, but will require a bit of time and patience. No worries. I will guide you through the entire process.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 C AP flour
  • 1 stick butter
  • 1/2 C canola oil
  • 1 green pepper, tiny dice
  • 1 stalk celery, tiny dice
  • 1/2 white onion, tiny dice
  • 1 large, or 2 small minced garlic cloves
  • 5 fresh okra, cut into rounds
  • 1 lb. andouille sausage, cut into rounds
  • 1 1/2 C seafood stock
  • 4 C chicken stock
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 to 2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 2 tsp black pepper
  • 1 1/2 C shredded chicken
  • 1 lb. shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 2 TBLS fresh parsley, chopped
  • cornstarch or gumbo file
  • 2 C prepared rice

Instructions

  1. In a heavy bottom pan, melt the butter with the oil over medium heat.
  2. Slowly whisk in the flour, just a little at a time.
  3. Continue whisking until the roux turns chocolate in color (see post for tips).
  4. Remove the pot from the heat.
  5. Add in the onions, green pepper, celery, garlic and okra. Cook in the roux for just a few minutes.
  6. Pour in the seafood stock, chicken stock and cayenne pepper.
  7. Season with kosher salt and black pepper. Whisk to combine.
  8. Add in the bay leaves, andouille sausage and shredded chicken.
  9. Bring to a boil.
  10. Turn heat down to a simmer. Simmer for about an hour.
  11. Remove the bay leaves.
  12. Add in the shrimp. Allow to cook until they are pink and no longer translucent.
  13. Use a cornstarch mixture or gumbo file to thicken, if needed.
  14. Add in a tablespoon of fresh chopped parsley.
  15. To plate, add rice to a bowl. Ladle on the gumbo.
  16. Garnish with more fresh chopped parsley.
  17. Serve with hot sauce, if desired.

Notes

SEE POST!

Nutrition

  • Serving Size:3/4 cup

Keywords: what is gumbo, what is jambalaya, what is the difference between gumbo and jambalaya, what is a roux, how to make a roux, New Orleans Style Gumbo, how to make New Orleans style gumbo, how long does it take to make a dark roux, how long does it take to make gumbo, what is gumbo file, what kind of meat to use in gumbo,

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12 Comments

  1. Thank you for showing how to make a Roux – I need to make this!

    • Thank you! Absolutely. Yes. Once you get the roux down it’s smooth sailing! Just be very patient with it!

  2. HOW MANY DOES THIS FEED?

    • Hello Jen!
      This will feed four to six people.
      Thank you!
      Melissa

      • THANKS! IM GOING TO MAKE IT TOMORROW. FROM START TO FINISH ABOUT HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE TO COOK?

        • Awesome. The roux is what really takes the longest and most of your devoted attention. You really need to stand by it until it forms a deep brown without burning. The last time I made this, the roux took me over an hour. Believe me, so worth every single second. All in with prep, you are probably looking at 2 1/2 hours. Plan on 3 and all should be good. Let me know! Thank you.

  3. I MADE IT LAST NIGHT. IT WAS WONDERFUL!!!!!!!!!! EVERYONE LOVED IT. THE ONLY THING I DIDNT PUT IN IT WAS THE ORKA. I WILL BE MAKING IT AGAIN AND AGAIN. THANKS SO MUCH FOR SHARING THE RECEIPT. :))))))

  4. Finally a recipe I was confident using! My Mississippi friend approved and so did I! I will definitely make again and again! Thanks!

    • Good afternoon!
      This is so great. Thank you so very much.

  5. How much flour are you using? It says cap did you mean cup? Just want to make sure I do it right. It looks delicious!

    • Hello! It’s a cup…it’s 1 C AP Flour…the AP is all-purpose! Thank you!


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