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SCALLOPED POTATOES

Ingredients

  • 5 to 6 large red or Yukon gold potatoes, sliced thin
  • kosher salt/pepper
  • 1 small onion, sliced thin
  • 1 to 1/2 sticks salted butter
  • 1 C whole milk or heavy whipping cream
  • 1/2 to 3/4 C flour
  • 1 C Gruyere cheese (optional)
  • 1 TBLS fresh parsley, chopped
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This is one of those most perfect side dishes I remember my Mom making when we were children. It’s super old school, and brings back many fond memories of watching my Mom in the kitchen. Comfort food at it’s best. The rich and creamy sauce, combined with flour, butter, and onions is so very simple, with a subtle elegance. Even though we cook quite differently today, she taught me so much about the importance of family meals. Hope you enjoy this recipe for Scalloped Potatoes. It has been in my Family for generations.

Typically, these Scalloped Potatoes would be made in a casserole or baking dish. I just wanted to have a little bit of fun and use red and white creamer potatoes I found at Unity Farms with these All-Clad cocottes. Want to try a more “upscale” version of Scalloped Potatoes? Check out my recipe for Dauphinoise Potatoes.

Bare with me as this recipe is not really about measurements, but more about building the layers. Lumps versus no lumps? Some recipes call for mixing the flour and milk/cream so as not to have lumps. It is my belief that if there was ever a time for lumps in your potatoes, it’s for this recipe! Team lumps all the way!

Cheese or no cheese? Ok, so if you add cheese then they tend to be more of an au gratin. Who cares! Add the cheese, or not. Totally up to you. I wouldn’t normally, but I had Gruyere on hand, so I threw a touch on at the end and broiled for a few minutes to brown.

two pots of scalloped potatoes

HOW TO LAYER FOR SCALLOPED POTATOES

As mentioned earlier, this recipe is all about building layers of goodness and flavor. There is really no right or wrong way, as long as each layer contains the building ingredients.

First things first. Thinly slice the potatoes. Peel or don’t peel? Again, totally up to you. You can slice by hand or with a mandoline. If you are using a mandoline, be sure to use the guard. Take my word for this after having suffered from many, many cuts because I thought I could get by without it.

slicing a potato on a mandoline

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line a casserole or baking dish with a thin layer of butter. Be sure to butter the sides. Place sliced potatoes on bottom of baking dish in one layer. It’s quite ok if they overlap just a bit. Season with kosher salt and pepper. Take a spoon and dust the tops of the seasoned potatoes with flour. Again, it’s ok if the flour clumps in certain spots. The flour will bake long enough, so you will not have to worry about a raw flour taste. Dot the first layer with butter. Add a layer of the sliced onions. Pour about one-third of the milk or heavy cream over the layer.

Keep repeating these steps until you have used up all of the potatoes. You should be able to build three nice layers. Keep in mind that you may need a touch more flour or milk/cream as you are building the layers than what the recipe calls for. Most of us have these ingredients in our pantry, so use more if you need to.

Cover the casserole or baking dish with foil. Place in oven and allow to bake for at least an hour. Test the potatoes after an hour for doneness. Once potatoes are tender and falling apart, if you so desire, add a thin layer of shredded Gruyere cheese. Turn on the broiler, and allow the cheese to brown.

TO SERVE THE SCALLOPED POTATOES

Remove from broiler. Garnish with fresh chopped parsley. Serve up these magnificent Scalloped Potatoes with your favorite protein. ENJOY! Take a look how I served mine below!

These potatoes are even better the next day. So, if you have leftovers, which may be highly unlikely, serve them up for dinner tomorrow!

two pots of scalloped potatoes

BRASSTOWN BEEF

I was lucky enough to grab a few local, grass-fed ribeye and strips steaks from my Friends at Brasstown Beef. They are a ranch located in the Northwestern part of North Carolina. Steve Whitmire, owner, touts himself as more of a grass farmer, than a rancher. This means a lot to me, as his cattle are very well fed, and drink the same water his Family drinks. Read their entire story, and history on their website!

You can easily order from Brasstown Beef online. Shipping is quick. You can tell the packaging has been well thought out to ensure your order stays frozen during shipping. All of your items are packed in a thermal logo bag which is then placed in a styrofoam box lined with dry ice. Use my code CFP15 for discount!

a black thermal bag from Brasstown Beef

Now, let’s talk how phenomenal these steaks were. Each steak is individually, vacuumed sealed and frozen. Thaw gently in the fridge. Bring to room temperature prior to cooking. I grilled mine to a perfect medium-rare. The steaks were super tender, juicy and oh the FLAVOR! Try them out. Support local ranchers and farmers during these times. Remember that not only are restaurants having difficulties, but so are the small business that they source their products from. Be sure to grab a few packages of ground meat, burgers and do NOT forget the hot dogs! You will thank me later. I have more recipes coming soon using more of Brasstown Beef’s amazing meats! Do NOT forget to use CFP15 at checkout!

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